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Benefits and Requirements

Angelica Kauffman (Switzerland, 1741-Italy, 1807) . Vergil Reading to Augustus and Octavia the Passage from Aeneid VI bearing upon the Tragic Early Death of Octavia's Son, Augustus's beloved Nephew, Marcellus . 1788 . Neoclassicism

Benefits of the Curricular Diploma Program

  • A course of study and a correlative educational opportunity with no peer in the present educational environment.
  • The conditions, the environment, and the guidance that allow an engaged participant to develop skills, habits, dispositions, knowledge, and understanding of an order that will prepare him abundantly to make the very most of the very best that good colleges and universities have to offer.
  • If completed, an accomplishment approaching, or in many respects surpassing, the completion of a college or university major in Latin or Greek or both.
  • A complete descriptive transcript of one's curricular diploma studies at The Lancaster Center for Classical Studies to be sent upon request to the institutions of higher learning to which a current participant in the program chooses to apply during his 12th-grade year.
  • Support from The Lancaster Center for Classical Studies for a current participant's college or university application, in the form of strong letters of recommendation and other appropriate means.
  • An advanced, specialized Diploma in Latin or Greek Studies, or in both.
  • A very favourably impressive credential, the more so as it is an index of genuine, substantial, integrated accomplishment, not of the mere ability to score well on tests or to please teachers.
  • Living, deep-seated, skillfully developed access to the world of the mind, to the heritage of learning, and to one's own best potentialities for learning and growth.

Requirements of the Curricular Diploma Program

  • Persistent, engaged, conscientious traversal of the LCCS Latin or Greek Curriculum or both.
  • Continuous enrollment in the Curricular Program through the 12th grade, both during the regular academic year and during the summer session.
  • Enrollment in the Curricular Program is recommended beginning in the 5th grade; it is required no later than the 9th grade in order for the student to become eligible to receive the diploma.
  • In order to become eligible to receive the diploma by the end of his 12th-grade year, a student wishing to enroll in the Curricular Program for the first time as late as the 9th grade must demonstrate by examination a solid mastery of the material constitutive of Latin I or higher prior to the beginning of the 9th grade year.
  • Any student who wishes to enroll in the Curricular Program for the first time at a level higher than Latin I must demonstrate by examination a solid mastery of the material constitutive of the intended level of entrance.
  • Students enrolled in the Curricular Program must treat their Latin and Greek studies as a primary part of their total scholastic commitment.
  • A minimum of three hours of conscientious preparation is required for each hour of classroom instruction and participation.
  • The standard of the preparation is not the number of hours spent, however, but the quality of the preparation. This must be consistently high.
  • In order to remain qualified to continue in the Curricular Program, the student must continue consistently to fulfill the requirements of the pertinent syllabus.
  • A student who ceases to fulfill the requirements of the syllabus at a certain level may remain in the Curricular Program but step back to a suitable, earlier curricular level, or he may withdraw from the Curricular Program and return to the Extracurricular Program. Because of the importance of consistency and continuity in the curriculum, once having withdrawn from the Curricular Program, the student may not re-enter it.
  • Students and parents alike must give careful, honest, thoughtful consideration to the matter before electing to enroll in the Curricular Program.
  • It is a uniquely and abundantly rewarding program, and promises to open up possibiiities of learning, growth, and accomplishment available nowhere else; but it is a demanding program.
  • It asks for a serious devotion of time and energy, a consistently serious application of one's abilities, and a willingness to rise again and again to a continuously rising challenge which, having been met, defines a continuously rising level of accomplishment.
  • It asks continuously for the best of which one is capable, and it rewards those who rise to its challenge with the discovery that with hard work one is capable both of more and of better than one may have realized.

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